buy nothing day

Buy Nothing Day

It’s that time of year again . . .

Time for folks south of the border to line up in the freezing cold for hours on end outside big box stores to be trampled in a stampede and have their wigs pulled off. Also, you might be shot or killed. Watch your back when reaching for that new Wii. Just sayin’.

I saw a lot of that on CNN this morning, wig-pulling, that is. CNN also told me quite matter-of-factly this morning that shopper-agression is here to stay, so we might as well get used to it.

What?

What in the world convinces us to toss out our sanity, not to mention our dignity, to get a so-called deal on crap we don’t need?

Don’t get me wrong. My kid will have prezzies under the tree. My Amazon book order is in, and it was big. I struggle to walk that fine line between focusing on the experience, time with family, the meaning of Christmas and wanting my son to feel that same gasp of joy and surprise and excitement I knew as a child.

Surely there is a middle ground between brawling in Wal-Mart and a spartan holiday season.

Anyway . . .

I’ve participated in Buy Nothing Day for as long as I can remember. All that left-wing hippy-dippy liberal education will do that to you at a young age. Go figure.

Some years it was easy (like I was a teenager and broke) other years it was hard (working downtown and forgoing my two daily trips to Starbucks for example.) These days, I don’t need much, so I don’t buy much. It gets easier.

Tomorrow might be Black Friday, but it’s also Buy Nothing Day. I invite you to join me.

Stand up. Fight back. Buy nothing.

8 thoughts on “buy nothing day

  1. solarbeez

    I totally agree! We take it a step further…we avoid shopping Wal-Mart altogether. We just don’t feel that it’s moral to buy from a company that uses slave labor. It must be that darn hippy-dippy liberal education.

    Reply
    1. The Slow Foods Mama Post author

      Us too. There are lots of other stores that are arguably as bad, but something about avoiding shopping at Wal-Mart is a symbolic silent personal protest for me.

      It’s easy to see how so many families get sucked into the “save money live better” marketing ploy. When you don’t have a lot of money to go around it’s tough to make choices like that.

      But at the end of the day, part of the reason lots of working-class folks don’t have enough money is because the Wal-Marts of the world pay their employees peanuts and drive down the prices on manufactured goods the world over. Not enough people make that connection, which is sad.

      Reply
  2. patsquared2

    There must be something wrong with me because I have NEVER responded to things like Black Friday…and like solarbeez, I don’t spend my after tax dollars at the fronts for mega-corporations. Even if I have to travel a bit to get there, I buy from farmers and crafters in my area. I also support fair trade companies like http://www.lucuma.com . I said it during our election and I’ll say it again. We should all use our heads, our hearts and our wallets to make our voices heard. Long live hippies and our wonderful, sweet education.

    Reply
  3. the food fighters

    We’ve been observing Buy Nothing Day for years–I was a big AdBusters fan in my youth. I would like to remove Black Friday from our lexicon–my friend’s ESL student recently made a list of American holidays and they listed Black Friday as an important American holiday. That’s just disturbing.

    Reply
  4. Bridget Manley

    I completely agree. I have a close relative who works at Wal-Mart, and Black Friday is the one day of the year she dreads most. People just go straight to Looney Town when the doors open, which seems to happen earlier each year.
    I think part of Black Friday’s appeal is it allows — heck, even encourages — people to act on the aggression and abject greed they have to suppress the rest of the year. Like most reality TV, it rewards bad behavior. Push, shove, and fight your way to the beginning of the line, and you get the last 30-inch flat screen before any of those other suckers behind you. Oy. Needless to say, I’ll be staying home today.

    Reply
    1. The Slow Foods Mama Post author

      I feel so sorry for your relative. I’ve worked retail in the mall and dreaded boxing day like the plague. Working in retail you don’t get much respect at the best of times.

      You’re so right that it encourages ridiculous behaviour. Just the fact that CNN repeated stated that shopper-agression is here to stay was ridiculous. And the fact that people die – I mean that’s just absurd.

      Sadly, rather than rejecting this weird cultural practice, we Canadians are importing it. Canadian retailers are doing everything they can to keep their retail dollars from heading south . . . We’re hot on your heels to crazy-town!

      Reply
    2. solarbeez

      “Push, shove, and fight your way to the beginning of the line, and you get the last 30-inch flat screen before any of those other suckers behind you. Oy. Needless to say, I’ll be staying home today.”

      We should be UNPLUGGING the tv, not buying one. Cut the cord so all that corporate brainwashing stays out of your home.

      Reply

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